TREATING SYMPTOMS IN CHILDREN CAN CAUSE FUTURE HEALTH PROBLEMS
Written by Dr. Paul G. Jensen   
Experts in child development stress the importance of developing learning, social, and coordination skills, but I seldom hear of anyone (including pediatricians) encouraging the proper development of biological skills such as immune and healing response, lymphatic function or metabolism of toxins.
If a child is having trouble reading, a teacher or parent does not simply take over and do the reading for the child. They know that reading difficulties are a symptom of a deeper issue, for example, the child may just need more reading practice or glasses.

Just as children can overcome reading difficulties, they can also overcome poor health if the underlying issue is addressed. Unfortunately, when a child has a health issue, parents and health care providers usually take over and treat the symptoms with medicine, not understanding that there are deeper issues that the child’s body must learn to overcome.
As developing reading skills supports academic success, developing biological skills by properly supporting, instead of suppressing symptoms supports good health.

Symptoms although very unpleasant for the child (as well as the parent caring for the child) are not the enemy and should not be treated as such. For example; a fever helps inhibit growth of bacteria and viruses as well as enhances immune function. Coughing, runny nose, and diarrhea help the body expel toxins.

Symptoms are like warning lights in your car’s dashboard. If you just unplug the warning light when it goes on and keep driving, your car engine will eventually fail. Rashes, allergies, ear infections, colic as well as hyperactivity are a warning of malfunction in the body. Suppressing these symptoms with ointments, drugs, antibiotics and Ritalin only leads to poor health. Many asthmatic children, for example, have a history of skin problems that were treated (suppressed) with steroid creams. I can trace most adults’ chronic problems back to improperly treated childhood symptoms.



Last Updated ( Tuesday, 26 June 2007 )